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“There are certain things God will not say.”

A thought by John Ortberg from his book, What Is God's Will for My Life? (p. 94). Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition. (Click on the book title to go to Amazon.com to buy the book.)
John says, “He won’t say: ‘Be anxious’; or ‘Think only about yourself’; or ‘You might as well give up in despair.’”  He won't say that.
And if you have spent time with him, reading his word and meditating on it you will know that he says the complete opposite.
But as John says, “I might be tempted to say those things to myself. But if I hear those thoughts, I can be confident they are not from God.”
He goes on, “Developing the ability to be guided by God is more about consistent obedience than about spectacular discernment.
“But I must cultivate the habit of listening. This means making the time and space for reflection. It requires that I stop talking every now and again and get away from noise and screens and stimulation. It means silence. In George Bernard Shaw’s play about Joan of Arc, Jo…

“When you face a choice and make a decision, don’t limp across the threshold. Hop.”

A thought by John Ortberg from his book, What Is God's Will for My Life?(p. 70). Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition. (Click on the book title to go to Amazon.com to buy the book.)
The matter of making a choice is really tough before you make it but many times it is tough after you make it.Have you found that true?
John says, “Often in life when we make a choice, we’re tempted to obsess over the question of whether we chose the best option. Often this will happen most when it helps the least—when we’re frustrated or depressed with our decision.”
He goes on, “We compare the best-imagined aspects of choice B with the most exaggerated difficulties of the choice we’ve made: how friendly the people at place B would have been, or how much better a fit job B would have been, or what a better spouse B would have been.
“We don’t recognize that there is no script for how things would have gone with plan B, just as there’s no script for how things will go with plan A. The biggest dete…

“God doesn’t want compliance; he wants connection.”

A thought by John Ortberg from his book, I'd Like You More If You Were More Like Me: Getting Real about Getting Close(Kindle Location 161). Tyndale Momentum. Kindle Edition. (Click on the book title to go to Amazon.com to buy the book.)
Maybe you think the opposite is true. And for many other relationships, you think that is also true.  
John says, “Not long after God decided it was ‘not good for the man to be alone,’ we find him walking in the Garden searching for Adam and Eve. They were his creation; he enjoyed their company, and he wanted to spend time with them. But they were hiding. Finally, he calls out, ‘Where are you?’ (Gen. 3: 8-9)
“Unfortunately, the serpent had convinced Eve to eat from the tree of life, and she had cut Adam in on some of the fruit. Now their relationship with God had changed — the bonds of intimacy were broken. For the first time, they realized they were naked, and they were embarrassed and ashamed. For the first time, they feared being seen and known by …

“Did you know that God never takes His eyes off you?”

A thought by Mark Batterson from his book, Whisper: How to Hear the Voice of God (p. 181). The Crown Publishing Group. Kindle Edition. (Click on the book title to go to Amazon.com to buy the book.)
Did you know that?
Mark says, “Do you know why? Because you’re the apple of His eye! (See Psalm 17:8) Not only that, His ear is tuned to your voice, so tuned that He hears more than words.”
Psalm 5:1, (HCSB) says, “Listen to my words, LORD; consider my sighing.”
Mark then says, “A sigh is a long, deep breath. It’s a physiological response to sadness. And it’s very similar to the gentle whisper of the still small voice. Sighing is what we do when we don’t know what to say. But according to the psalmist, it’s more than a low-frequency distress signal; it’s a wordless prayer.
“The death of my father-in-law, Bob Schmidgall, might rank as the greatest shock of my life. At fifty-five years of age, he was in the prime of life. He had even been given a clean bill of health by his doctor two days before …