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Showing posts with the label The Case for Grace

“There’s nothing you can do that will cause God to love you any more than he already does.”

A thought by Lee Strobel (2015-02-24) from his book, The Case for Grace: A JournalistExplores the Evidence of Transformed Lives (Case for ... Series) (p. 53). Zondervan. Kindle Edition. (Click on the title to go to Amazon.com to buy the book.)
It is so easy for us to get in the performance rat race of living for Christ. 
There is a story behind this thought.  Lee who was a staff minister at the time said, “One night I got a call from the church’s senior pastor, Bill Hybels. ‘I heard a nasty rumor about you,’ he said. I was taken aback. ‘Like what?’ ‘That you’re working at the church sixty or seventy hours a week. That you’re there late into the night and all day Sunday.’ To be honest, I swelled with pride. That’s right, I wanted to say. I’m the hardest working member of the staff. Finally, it’s time for some recognition and thanks — if not directly from God, then from my pastor. I said with some modesty: ‘Well, I am working hard, if that’s what you mean.’ Now his voice had an edge. ‘If…

“A young person’s relationship with his father can greatly color his attitude toward God.”

A thought by Lee Strobel (2015-02-24) from his book, The Case for Grace: A Journalist Explores the Evidence of Transformed Lives (Case for ... Series)(p. 18). Zondervan. Kindle Edition. (Click on the title to go to Amazon.com to buy the book.)
We have just come through the celebration of our mothers.  Mother’s Day is a very important time of honoring and thanking our mothers for the major impact they have in our lives but so do our fathers.
I had a very strong relationship with my father.  He was my idol.  A major part of my beliefs about life come from my father.  He was truly a great gift from God and he showed me how to have a strong relationship with my heavenly Father.
Lee said, “I wasn’t aware that many well-known atheists through history — including Friedrich Nietzsche, David Hume, Bertrand Russell, Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, Arthur Schopenhauer, Ludwig Feuerbach, Baron d’Holbach, Voltaire, H. G. Wells, Madalyn Murray O’Hair, and others — had felt abandoned or deeply disappoi…