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Showing posts with the label Because of Bethlehem

“God made so little of his Son’s coming.”

A thought by Max Lucado from his book, Because of Bethlehem (with Bonus Content): Love Is Born, Hope Is Here (p. 132). Thomas Nelson. Kindle Edition. (Click on the book title to go to Amazon.com to buy the book.)
We, parents and grandparents, make such big deals of birthdays, don’t we?But what about God the Father?
Max says, “God made so little of his Son’s coming. He didn’t even circle the date on the calendar. Ancient Christmases bounced from date to date before landing on December 25. Some early leaders favored dates in March. For centuries, the Eastern Orthodox church celebrated Christmas on January 6, and some still do. Only in the fourth century did the church choose December 25 as the date to celebrate Jesus’ coming. We’ve made bigger deals out of lesser comings. How could this be? No exact date of birth. No hoopla at his birth. Is this a mistake?Or is this the message?
“Maybe your life resembles a Bethlehem stable. Crude in some spots, smelly in others. Not much glamour. Not alw…

“A remarkable gift can arrive in an unremarkable package.”

A thought by Max Lucado from his book, Because of Bethlehem (with Bonus Content): Love Is Born, Hope Is Here (p. 108). Thomas Nelson. Kindle Edition. (Click on the book title to go to Amazon.com to buy the book.)
Have you ever given a significant gift that you wrapped in an ordinary box so they wouldn’t guess what it was?It was an incredible gift that you gave them to show them you loved them.And they were really surprised.  It's a fact, “a remarkable gift can arrive in an unremarkable package.”
Max says, “One did in Bethlehem.  No one expected God to come the way he did.”
Max later says, “He entered the world not to demand our allegiance but to display his affection.”
He continues, “Jesus descended the ladder of incarnation one rung at a time. In nature, God. He did not grasp equality with God. He made himself nothing. He took on the form of a servant. He submitted himself to death. Even death on a cross. Down, down, down, down. From heaven’s crown to Bethlehem’s cradle to Jerusalem’…

“’Tis the season to be looking.”

A thought by Max Lucado from his book, Because of Bethlehem (with Bonus Content): Love Is Born, Hope Is Here (p. 93). Thomas Nelson. Kindle Edition. (Click on the book title to go to Amazon.com to buy the book.)
There is so much looking to be done.
Max says, “Looking for snow if it’s cold, mistletoe if he’s dense, instructions if some assembly is required. Looking for red-nose lights if you’re young, headlights if you’re a grandma, insights if you’re a preacher. ’Tis the season to be looking.”
We also are looking at the birth of Jesus, looking at that First Advent. But there is also a Second Advent to be looking for this season.
Max says, “We live between the Advents. The Second Advent will include the sudden, personal, visible, bodily return of Christ. Jesus promised, ‘I will come again’ (John 14: 3 RSV). The author of Hebrews declared, ‘Christ . . . will appear a second time, not to deal with sin but to save those who are eagerly waiting for him’ (9: 28 RSV).”
Later he says, “If you knew…

“Haughtiness hurts people.”

A thought by Max Lucado from his book, Because of Bethlehem (with Bonus Content): Love Is Born, Hope Is Here (p. 86). Thomas Nelson. Kindle Edition. (Click on the book title to go to Amazon.com to buy the book.)
It really does.  And for sure it doesn’t lift up people, does it?
Max says, “The other day I saw some children at play on a large vacant lot where someone had dumped a mound of dirt. They were playing the greatest of kid games: King of the Mountain. The rules are as simple as they are brutal: fight your way to the top, and shove off anyone who threatens to take your spot. It was a slugfest of crawling, pushing, and falling.
“King of the Mountain is not just a kid’s game. Versions are played in every dormitory, classroom, boardroom, and bedroom. And since mountaintop real estate is limited, people get shoved around. Mark it down: if you want to be king, someone is going to suffer. Your uppitiness won’t prompt a Bethlehem massacre, but it might prompt a broken marriage, an estrange…