Friday, June 24, 2016

“When you look up to people, they begin to look up to their dreams.”

A thought by John C. Maxwell (2013-02-15) from his book, Be A People Person: Effective Leadership Through Effective Relationships (p. 166). David C. Cook. Kindle Edition. (Click on the title of the book to go to Amazon.com to buy the book.)

But it is so easy for us to look down on people isn’t it?

John gives a great illustration of this principle.  He says, “The business manager at our church placed his house on the market. One Saturday he and his wife posted signs all over the neighborhood announcing an open house. As they prepared for the day, Ken told his wife, Mary Lynn, ‘We’re going to have all kinds of people come in and out of the house today, most with absolutely no resources or intention of buying. But we’re going to treat them all the same— as if they were our guests.’ Sure enough, they had dozens of people come through just to look. One young couple in their early twenties asked to see the house. They announced that they were newly married, she had no job, and he was just starting a new job. After the tour they extended their thanks and left. Ken and Mary Lynn announced to each other, ‘Well, we’ll never see them again.’ But in just thirty minutes they saw a very expensive car drive up and park in front of the house. The same young couple returned— this time with mom and dad. The father shook Ken’s hand and said, ‘The kids sure liked your home. This will be a cash sale; how short can we make the escrow?’”

John then shares, “I’m certain that Ken and Mary Lynn’s high level of anticipation filtered through to each person who crossed the threshold of their home. They had no idea what benefits that positive attitude would bring.”

John said at the beginning of this section, “If we have a high expectation level and believe in people, we will encourage them. Again, it is the principle of seeing people not as they are but as they can be.”

So let’s quit looking down on people and looking up to them.  It will make a difference for them and also to us.


So are you willing to start today?

Thursday, June 23, 2016

“Encouragement has the effect of a gentle rain; it causes steady growth.”

A thought by John C. Maxwell (2013-02-15) from his book, Be A People Person: Effective Leadership Through Effective Relationships (p. 162). David C. Cook. Kindle Edition. (Click on the title of the book to go to Amazon.com to buy the book.)

Who in your life has encouraged you?  It made a difference didn’t it?

John shares, “The secret of Andrew Carnegie’s genius for developing others was his ability to encourage good qualities while holding faultfinding to a minimum.”

He also says, “I have yet to find the person, whatever his or her station in life, who did not perform better under a spirit of approval than under criticism. There are enough critics in the world; what we need are more cheerleaders!”

Let me give you some words of encouragement from a poem that John shared:

“People are unreasonable, illogical, and self-centered— love them anyway!

If you do good, people will accuse you of selfish ulterior motives— do good anyway!

If you are successful, you will win false friends and true enemies— succeed anyway!

The good you do today will be forgotten tomorrow— do good anyway!

Honesty and frankness make you vulnerable— be honest and frank anyway! 

The biggest people with the biggest ideas can be shot down by the smallest people with the smallest minds— think big anyway!

People favor underdogs but follow only top dogs— fight for some underdog anyway!

What you spend years building may be destroyed overnight— build anyway!

Give the world the best you’ve got and you’ll get kicked in the teeth— give the world the best you’ve got anyway!”

I want to cheer you on today.  God created you to make a difference and He has great plans for you and through you.  You have what it takes.


So who can you cheer on today?

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

“Always give confrontation the ‘sandwich treatment.’”

A thought by John C. Maxwell (2013-02-15) from his book, Be A People Person: Effective Leadership Through Effective Relationships (p. 157). David C. Cook. Kindle Edition. (Click on the title of the book to go to Amazon.com to buy the book.)

There will be times that we need to confront as a parent, as a boss or as a friend. There are also times that you and I need to be confronted.  John gives some good thoughts on this. 

John says, “Always give confrontation the ‘sandwich treatment.’ Sandwich the criticism between praise at the beginning and encouragement at the end. To leave a discouraged person without hope is cruel and vindictive. Goethe, the German poet, said, ‘Correction does much, but encouragement does more. Encouragement after censure is as the sun after a shower.’”

That is very good.

John then says, “In my effort to simplify things as much as possible, I have come up with one-word descriptions of the various ways people will respond to confrontation:

BYE. The ‘bye’ people never profit from confrontation; they don’t hang around long enough. Their egos are too fragile.
SPY. Spies become suspicious of everyone. They begin an investigation to find out who in the organization is out to get them. Often they will avoid risking a failure again.
FRY. Some people will simply get mad and either fly of the handle or do a slow burn.
LIE. The liar has an excuse for every mistake. Therefore he never faces up to the reality of his situation.
CRY. Crybabies are overly sensitive and become hurt by confrontation. Unlike the ‘bye’ people, criers hang around in hopes that people will see how mistreated they are and sympathize with them. They have a martyr complex.
SIGH. These people have a That’s-too-bad-but-there’s-nothing-I-can-do-about-it attitude. They don’t accept any responsibility for making right the wrong.
FLY. This category of people takes criticism and flies with it. They learn from it and become better because of it.”

Such good advice.


So which category are you in when you are confronted?