Tuesday, May 3, 2016

“People’s strengths and their individual purposes are always connected.”

A thought by John C. Maxwell (2015-10-06) from his book, Intentional Living: Choosing a Life That Matters (p. 83). Center Street. Kindle Edition. (Click on the title of the book to go to Amazon.com to buy the book.)

Why am I here?  What am I supposed to do with my life?  What is my purpose?  All of those are important questions that will make a difference in how we look at our strengths.

John says, “People’s strengths and their individual purposes are always connected. I embrace that truth because I believe God has gifted everyone with the ability to be great at what they are supposed to do.” 

He then says, “Your why is fuel for your strengths. And your strengths are the way to fulfill your why. Every time you use your strengths to live out your why, you build on your strength and increase your why. Living this way adds layers of ability, purpose, credibility, and significance to your life. The more you do, the more you learn, because you are layering each experience into your life.”

He then explains, “Think about it like this. When you start off doing something, you are usually not very good at it. But with time and practice, you get better. After a while, you create layers of success that you can build on, and you also build up tremendous confidence as a result. That’s what great athletes do. They don’t start off playing their sport at a professional level. It takes years of practice to get to the highest level. How do they do it? They layer wins, losses, pain, and gain.”

He then finishes this section by saying, “When you know your why, you know the history and purpose of each experience in your life.”

That is how God works it all together.


Do you see the importance of knowing your why?

Monday, May 2, 2016

“Once you find your why, you will be able to find your way.”

A thought by John C. Maxwell (2015-10-06) from his book, Intentional Living: Choosing a Life That Matters (p. 79). Center Street. Kindle Edition. (Click on the title of the book to go to Amazon.com to buy the book.)

Have you ever stopped and asked those important questions about your life?  Questions like: Why am I here? What path should I be on?  I know that doesn’t sound like a fun time even for me at 68 but it can be so very meaningful.  The truth is we don’t want to take the time to find anything, we want it handed to us, don’t we?

In looking at the first question John said, “If you know your why and focus on going there with fierce determination, you can make sense of everything on your journey because you see it through the lens of why. This makes the way so much more meaningful and complete because you have context to understand the reason you’re on the journey in the first place.”

He then says, “Recently while speaking to a group on the subject of purpose, I made the following statement: ‘Once you find your why, you will be able to find your way.’ How do those things differ? Why is your purpose. Way is your path.”

He goes on, “During the Q& A that followed, someone asked, ‘Does the why always have to come first? Can you find your way and then find your why?’ You may be wondering the same thing. What has to come first? The good news is that either can be first. But if the why comes before the way, your ability to make a difference will come more quickly and immediately be more effective.

He then gives a practical example, “Think of it like this. Have you ever wondered why people often find great joy in packing for a vacation? They spend weeks building up great anticipation, looking forward to those warm days on a tropical beach or trips down the slopes of their favorite ski resort. So they pick out each item that goes into the suitcase with great purpose. When you get ready for a trip, almost all of your effort is focused on the purpose of the trip. That’s why it’s a lot more fun to pack for a trip than it is to unpack afterward. This concept applies more broadly to our lives. Whatever path you travel, you’re going to be able to do things more significantly because you understand your purpose for being there.”


So will you spend some time on your why?

Friday, April 29, 2016

“God helps to make my best, as flawed as it is, even better.”

A thought by John C. Maxwell (2015-10-06) from his book, Intentional Living: Choosing a Life That Matters (p. 70). Center Street. Kindle Edition. (Click on the title of the book to go to Amazon.com to buy the book.)

As John says, “It is always my desire to do my best. I have adopted Coach Wooden’s motto ‘Make every day your masterpiece,’ so it’s a given that I will give my best everyday.”

That is so important.  But then he says, “But God helps to make my best, as flawed as it is, even better. I have always believed that God will be there for me and help me. In fact, my belief in myself grows out of my faith. I totally embrace the words in Jeremiah 29: 11: ‘ For I know the plans I have for you,’ declares the Lord, ‘plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.’  That has given me confidence to act, and if you also embrace faith, it will give you confidence, too.”

John quotes Catherine Bramwell-Booth who says “Anybody can do their best. God helps us do better than our best.”

He goes on, “Bob Pierce, the founder of World Vision, called this ‘God room.’ It was the gap between what he could humanly accomplish and what could happen only if God helped him. I have chosen to leave a lot of ‘God room’ in my life also. I firmly believe God will make up the difference if my heart is right and I do my best. The verse in the Bible that best describes this ‘God room’ is Ephesians 3: 20, which says, ‘God can do anything, you know— far more than you could ever imagine or guess or request in your wildest dreams! He does it by working within us.’”

Such a good thought for us today.


So are you doing your best and believing that God will make it even better?