Friday, July 22, 2016

“When things go wrong, the natural tendency is to look for someone to blame.”

A thought by John C. Maxwell (2016-02-02) from his book, 3 Things Successful People Do: The Road Map That Will Change Your Life (p. 118). Thomas Nelson. Kindle Edition. (Click on the title of the book to go to Amazon.com to buy the book.)

Maybe you’re in a bad situation and you are wondering whose fault it is.  But John says, “The next time you experience a failure, think about why you failed instead of who was at fault. Try to look at it objectively so that you can do better next time.”

He then shares from his friend, Bobb Biehl a list of questions to help you analyze any failure.  Here they are:

“• What lessons have I learned? • Am I grateful for this experience? • How can I turn the failure into success? • Practically speaking, where do I go from here? • Who else has failed in this way before, and how can that person help me? • How can my experience help others someday to keep from failing? • Did I fail because of another person, because of my situation, or because of myself? • Did I actually fail, or did I fall from taking it? • Others: No one but you is responsible for the choices you make today. You may have been hurt or abused in the past, but it’s up to you to overcome that injury— just as you would a physical one— and move beyond it.”

John then says, “People who blame others for their failures never overcome them. They move from problem to problem, and as a result, they never experience success. To reach your potential, you must continually improve yourself, and you can’t do that if you don’t take responsibility for your actions and learn from your mistakes.”

As Rick Warren says, Blaming is being lame.”  Accept responsibility and learn and grow from them. 


So do you have the problem of blaming?

Thursday, July 21, 2016

“If you keep hitting the wall, it may be time to back up and look for the door.”

A thought by John C. Maxwell (2016-02-02) from his book, 3 Things Successful People Do: The Road Map That Will Change Your Life (p. 117). Thomas Nelson. Kindle Edition. (Click on the title of the book to go to Amazon.com to buy the book.)

Is this you?  Do you seem to keep hitting the same wall?

John says, “If you keep hitting the wall, it may be time to back up and look for the door. If you keep taking the same detour, maybe it’s not a detour but your main road. However, when you experience failure after failure but your dream burns within you just as strongly as ever, keep going. Also recognize that some of the greatest accomplishments of life literally were birthed out of failure.”

He then says, “For example, look at the life of John James Audubon. He is considered a pioneer in wildlife study and preservation. But in the early 1800s, he was merely an unsuccessful shopkeeper in Louisville, Kentucky. He attempted to support himself and his wife, Lucy, in that occupation, but after struggling for eleven years, he finally went bankrupt. That failure prompted him to pursue his life’s work— observing, drawing, and painting wildlife, the thing for which he will always be remembered.”

John continues, “If you’re repeatedly experiencing failure but you want to fail forward, allow your mistakes to redirect you. Maybe you’re working someplace where you don’t really fit. That doesn’t mean that you’re bad or wrong. It just means that you need to make an adjustment. If one door repeatedly closes on you, don’t stand there forever wondering why you can’t get it open. Look around for another open door. One may be standing open right now that you’ve continually overlooked.”

Just a thought to think about today.


Did it help as you view what you are going through?

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

“Most people who never learn to fail forward are stopped because they take failure personally.”

A thought by John C. Maxwell (2016-02-02) from his book, 3 Things Successful People Do: The Road Map That Will Change Your Life (p. 116). Thomas Nelson. Kindle Edition. (Click on the title of the book to go to Amazon.com to buy the book.)

This matter of failing forward is such an important thing to believe and do.  

In a continuation of this thought on people taking failure personal John says, “They start saying to themselves, ‘Why can’t you do anything right?’ or ‘You shouldn’t have tried; you knew you couldn’t do it,’ or ‘See that; you’re a failure!’

John then says, “But there is a huge difference between saying ‘I have failed’ and ‘I am a failure.”  Someone who has failed can learn from her mistakes and move on. It doesn’t change who she is. But the person who tells himself, ‘I am a failure,’ gives himself little hope of improvement. No matter what he does or where he goes, his failure stays with him because he has internalized it. He makes it an inseparable part of him. Asking someone who has convinced himself that he is a failure to be successful would be like asking an apple tree to produce cantaloupes. It can’t be done.”

Negative self-talk has such power over us as does positive self-talk.

John ends this section by saying, “If you’re in the habit of assassinating your own character or questioning your talent every time something goes wrong, stop it. Making mistakes is like breathing; it’s something you’ll keep doing as long as you’re alive. So learn to live with it and move on.”

I like how John Ortberg in his book, What is God’s Will For My Life? puts it.  He says, “Moses chose murder. David chose murder and adultery and a cover-up. Gideon chose fear. Samson chose Delilah. Elijah chose to run away from Jezebel. Jonah chose a watery escape. Peter chose to lop off a soldier’s ear. And yet all of them are in the book. God isn’t in the business of rejecting people who make wrong choices; he’s in the business of redeeming them. If only people who made correct choices were used by God, the Bible would be a much shorter book, and Jesus would be the only character.

God uses our mistakes if we confess them and give them to Him.


So what is your self-talk telling you today?